Indiana State University Library

Indiana State University Library Blog

TDplus Project – Guidance Briefs Public Review and Use

Posted by isulib on May 12, 2016

EducopiaLogoIndiana State University Library, represented by Data Curation Librarian Kayla Siddell, is a participant in the ETDplus project funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services and led by the Educopia Institute. The focus of this study is the long term preservation of and sustained access to research data and complex digital objects that are part of electronic theses and dissertations. The Guidance Briefs that are a portion of the grant’s deliverables are now available for review, use, and/or comment. Please feel free to examine the briefs and share with your graduate students and others who may be interested in the topic.InstituteMuseumLibrarySvcsLogo

– Cinda May, Chair of Special Collections

Preserving and Curating ETD Research Data and Complex Digital Objects, Guidance Briefs Available for Public Review and Use – (May 3-June 30, 2016)

The ETDplus project (https://educopia.org/research/grants/etdplus) invites Electronic Theses and Dissertations (ETD) program staff, librarians, faculty advisors, and graduate students to participate in a public review of the Guidance Briefs for Preserving & Curating ETD Research Data & Complex Digital Objects.

About the ETD Guidance Briefs
The Guidance Briefs are short (3-4 pages) “how-to” oriented briefs designed to help ETD programs build and nurture supportive relationships with student researchers. These briefs will assist student researchers in understanding how their approaches to data and content management impact credibility, replicable research, and general long-term accessibility: knowledge and skills that will impact the health of their careers for years to come.

Review (and Use!) the Guidance Briefs
Interested ETD stakeholders can download copies of the Guidance Briefs at the following website,https://educopia.org/deliverables/etdplus-guidance-briefs. The Guidance Briefs cover the following topics:

1.    Copyright
2.    Data Structures
3.    File Formats
4.    Metadata
5.    Storage
6.    Version Control

We are releasing these Briefs–both during this initial public review phase and after they are refined–as openly editable documents. We want institutions to use and reuse these in whatever way works for their local audiences. Each Brief includes generally applicable information about its topic, and also includes a “Local Practices” section that an institution may use to call attention to what’s happening on its own campus.
We invite you to help us refine these documents by drawing our project team’s attention to any components that need to be edited, revised, broadened, or narrowed. Please send us an email with your suggestions and/or track your changes within the documents and email those back to us at the addresses below by or before June 30, 2016. We plan to integrate the community’s feedback before formally issuing these Briefs under a CC BY 4.0 license later this summer.

If you have any further questions about the Guidance Briefs or about the ETDplus project, don’t hesitate to reach out to:

About the ETDplus Project

The ETDplus project is helping institutions ensure the longevity and availability of ETD research data and complex digital objects (e.g., software, multimedia files) that comprise an integral component of student theses and dissertations. The project is generously funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and led by the Educopia Institute, in collaboration with the NDLTD, HBCU Alliance, bepress, ProQuest, and the libraries of Carnegie Mellon, Indiana State, Morehouse, Oregon State, Penn State, Purdue, University of Louisville, University of Tennessee, the University of North Texas, and Virginia Tech.

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2016 Annual CML Student Assistant Appreciation Reception – A Great Success!

Posted by isulib on May 2, 2016

A Library cannot function without its student employees!

Cunningham Library’s 24th annual Student Appreciation reception was held on April 27th in the Events Area and it was one of the best attended of these ceremonies in years!  Your support of our wonderful student assistants is to be commended. Four special awards were presented and students from many areas of the library who will receive degrees in 2016 were recognized with gifts from the Dean. Congratulations and our best wishes to them all!

 2016 Hildegard Pang Award recipients:

  • Kyle Stephenson – Special Collections
  • Brendon Truax – Circulation

2016 Swearingen Family Award recipients:

  • Abigail Pierce – Circulation
  • Bryce Brocar – Circulation

  2016 Degree Recipients:

  • Ashley Bauer – Admin Office
  • Janelle DavidsonSpecial Collections
  • Matthew Goelz – Tech Services/Gov. Docs
  • Emily Gray – Tech Services/Gov. Docs
  • Brittany Irwin – Tech Services/Acquisitions
  • Sydney Jackson – Tech Services/Acquisitions
  • Cheyenne Jenkins – Tech Services/Acquisitions
  • Sowmya Kothapalli – Tech Services/ILL
  • Sarah Logsdon – Public Services
  • Ramya Sree Matcha – Tech Services/ILL
  • Geena McFaul – Public Services
  • Wesley Pershing – Public Services
  • Kyle Stephenson – Special Collections
  • Brendon Truax – Public Services
  • Alexis Vestal – Tech Services/ILL
  • Rob Whitman – Admin Office

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April 28 & 29: Honors theses presentations

Posted by isulib on April 28, 2016

Students in the University Honors Program will present their honors thesis research on April 28 and 29 in the Library Events Area.

The poster sessions are open to the campus community and visitors at the following dates/times:

 Session 1: Thursday, April 28, 9:00-11:00 AM

  • Alexandra Albrecht: Technology and the effect on students’ literacy
  • Olivia Bays: Bilingual education in the United States: Classroom methods
  • Tucker Brush: Bringing quality healthcare to rural areas
  • Leslie Cates: Athletic trainers: Paving the way in patient-centered care
  • Bryant Clayton: A matter of love and hate: R&B’s symbiotic relationship of the African American community
  • Victoria Collins: Stigma surrounding mental illness
  • Samantha Flis: The controversy of standardized testing
  • Lena Grunloh: Muscle activation during a downward dog push-up
  • Lisa Hathaway: Are there any relationships between results of the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory and dietary habits?
  • Jacob Kemp: Fibromyalgia: Fact or fiction? The debate inhibiting diagnosis and treatment
  • Tim Kemp: The unequivocal dangers of global warming: A need for increased climate change research and improved communication
  • Colby Pomar: The real world of standardized testing
  • Arnan Rahmatullah: An analysis of the Sit-To-Stand Test as a measure of vestibular health
  • Michaela Sherman: How Christian Are you?
  • Austin Skaggs: Whole-food plant-based diet: A comparative analysis to a western diet and the implications that they have on our health, economy, and environment

Session 2: Thursday, April 28, 12:30-2:30 PM

  • James Carroll: Sycamore Outdoor Center marketing plan
  • Shanita Davidson: College students’ personality and gender affects perceptions towards sexual behavior
  • David Heath: The schisms of “isms”
  • Allexis Mahurin: Smokeless tobacco effects on enamel health and dental caries
  • Erika Nord: Effects and causes of tooth decay
  • Dylan Rupska: The Sexual Revolution: How the culture of sex has changed
  • Amber Showalter: Generational conflicts in the workplace: Recommendations to solve these conflicts
  • Meagan Stenger: Wellness programs affecting the workforce
  • Samantha Trinkle: Educational and societal adaptations for deaf and hard of hearing individuals
  • Lacey Vair: Youth and vaping: The harmful effects of e-cigarettes
  • Nicholas Wine: Interpretatio Graeca: A study of the Ephesian Artemis
  • Faith York: ADD/ADHD in the classroom
  • Keeley Williams: Creating a chemotherapeutic breast cancer cell line

Session 3: Thursday, April 28, 2:30-4:30 PM

  • Taylor Cable: Caseload issues in Speech-Language Pathology
  • Bryah Edelen: Electronic cigarettes: Usage, safety, and chemical makeup
  • Megan Effner: Criminalization of co-occurring mental illness with substance abuse: A review of causes and current program effectiveness
  • Clifford Franklin: Shades of war: A thematic cross-examination of WWII music and literature
  • Greg Gallagher: Mobile devices in the physics classroom
  • Drew Garnes: Hip-Hop: From a movement to a business
  • Breanna Herring: Eating disorders in relation to dietetics and psychology
  • Emily Horine: The truth behind the Speech-Language Pathology shortage
  • Meghan Jacobson: The effects of standardized testing
  • Jackie Michl: The controversy of vaccines: Protecting our herd
  • Nicole Porter: Say yes to drugs: The ethical dilemmas of pharmaceutical industries and physicians
  • Kaitlyn Schmitt: Cochlear Implants: An exploration of history, advancements, and impacts on language
  • Haley Seifert: The racist roots of police brutality
  • Christopher Stanton: Defining our origins
  • Aubree Stebbins: TBA

Session 4: Friday, April 29, 8:00-10:00 AM

  • Joshua Appel: Adjusting to life after football
  • Jessica Axsom: Religious Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: The controversially effective treatment
  • Krystal Barnhorst: The use of technology and the impact on the legal profession
  • Dyllanne Deischer: United States immigration: Past, present, and future
  • Allison Duerk: America’s most dangerous woman: Anarchism, gender, and Emma Goldman
  • Baley Halberstadt: Creating a new reality: Saturday Night Live and perceptions of political candidates
  • Stephen Jones: The future of genetic testing
  • Jennie Martell: Does study abroad increase confidence?
  • Alana Murphy: An analysis of the factors controlling NASCAR attendance patterns
  • Kayla Pollock: Federal involvement in education: Is it benefiting America’s children?
  • Maci Reed: Men and women in nursing: Two different worlds
  • Jade Schitter: Vaccinating children
  • Nicholas Sparks: Nursing management of concussions in athletes
  • Caleb Strabavy: Privatization: What is it and why should it be used?
  • Sara Underhill: The relationship between Green Supply Chain Management and a value added triple bottom line

Session 5: Friday, April 29, 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

  • Priya Abhyankar: Civil war within: Understanding autoimmune disease
  • Brandon Applegate: The long term effects of Creatine supplementation while resistance training
  • Jessica Bicknell: TBA
  • Nicole Heath: Impact of universal healthcare
  • Nicole Kiger: The social and psychological effects of occupational therapy
  • Mariah Longyear: Fighting America’s obesity epidemic: Using an established approach to eradicate a new problem
  • Kristin McClinton: Smart Meters: The future of power
  • Madalaine Mishler: The modern day American church’s response to the impoverished
  • Carly Nash: Oenology and a variety of chemical aspects correlating to health
  • Savannah Ramion: Tattoos: The road to acceptance in Western Society: An exploration of gender, misconceptions, and workplace acceptance
  • Leslie Schubert: Standardized testing: Past, present, and future
  • Shane Sizemore: Unrest in the Midwest: The Terre Haute General Strike of 1935
  • James Steele: Music as propaganda: A study of the effects of music during World War II
  • Cecilia van Wijk: Internet hinders deliberative discourse
  • Sam Wetherall: Childhood obesity treatment: Information to present and consider during interventions

Session 6: Friday, April 29, 2:00-4:00 PM

  • Beth Fox: Medical TV dramas and their perception on the medical field
  • Samantha Horn: Federally criminalizing cyber-bullying
  • Katelyn Huhn: The over-diagnosing of ADHD and using alternative methods to medications
  • Brandon Lewis: The causes Of childhood obesity and the disparity between the American and Italian industrial systems
  • Elise Lima: Thwarting greenwashing: Creating a governmental certification program to ensure authenticity of green marketing claims
  • Natasha Mathew: Why is Clostridium Difficile Colitis more prevalent today?
  • Cameron McQuern: The utilization of analytics in agriculture
  • Sasha Odom: How Autism Spectrum Disorder affects the individual and the family
  • Tyler Rimmel: Cardiovascular disease
  • Erin Slaubaugh: Big Brother: An analysis of the strategies and psychological components of the game
  • Tyler Strain: Technology and its impact on medicine
  • Jamina Tribbett: The lost generation: The generational effects of Brown v. Board of Education on African American students
  • Valerie Taylor: The relevance of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in our society today
  • Jamil Topsi: The impact of media consumption on motivation in second language acquisition
  • Lindsay Vair: GMOs: More than just “Frankenfoods”

 

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Finals Week Studying in the Library = Food!

Posted by isulib on April 27, 2016

Banana? Cereal? Nuts? Coffee?

Find it all in the Events Area during Final Exams

FinalsWeekFood

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April 25 – 28: Evening Bake Sales in Library Lobby

Posted by isulib on April 25, 2016

  • 4/25/2016 – Indiana Student Educator Association Donut Sale (8:00 – 10DOUGHNUT:00 pm)
    Lobby

The funds raised will be used to fund outreach events to support professional growth for ISU students interested in the field
of education and to promote the teaching profession.

  • 4/26/2016 – Honors Council Bake Sale (7:00 pm – 10:00 pm)
  • 4/27/2016 – Honors Council Bake Sale (7:00 pm – 10:00 pm)

muffin

 

AND BACK TO

  • 4/28/2016 – Indiana Student Educator Association Donut Sale (8:00 – 10:00 pm)

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American Democracy Project: take the bus to vote!

Posted by isulib on April 22, 2016

ADP-earlyvotingpartybus

Buses available April 27 & 28, multiple times.

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ISU’s InDIPres funding from LSTA $$

Posted by isulib on April 20, 2016

2016 LSTA Indiana Memory Digitization Grants Awarded along with other projects!

The Indiana State Library has selected 13 projects to receive $229,510 in LSTA funding for the 2016-2017 grant year. Using grant funds, public, academic and special libraries will be contributing collections with a uniquely Indiana focus. This year’s projects will feature a number of topics, including Indiana’s automobile and limestone industries, LGBTQ histories, the Harmonists, newspapers, court records, architectural drawings, Hanover College history, and the USS LST Ship Memorial. Three collections will be focused on the histories of African Americans in the state, including South Bend, Bedford, and Indianapolis’s Bethel AME Church. The Indiana State Library will also continue their collaboration with Indiana State University to establish InDiPres, a statewide digital preservation solution for digital collections.

Many of the projects will invite Hoosiers to contribute materials during scan-a-thons held throughout the Bicentennial year. All materials digitized through the projects will eventually be available on Indiana Memory, the state’s digital library, and the Digital Public Library of America. For questions about the grants or Indiana Memory, please contact Connie Rendfeld at (317) 232-3694 or crendfeld@library.in.gov.

Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) funding is made possible by The Institute of Museum and Library Services, the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 35,000 museums. The Institute’s mission is to inspire libraries and museums to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Their grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow IMLS on Facebook and Twitter.

Reposted from State Library’s Wednesday Word, April 20, 2016

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April 21 (noon): Pizza & Politics: “Who Am I?”

Posted by isulib on April 19, 2016

Discussion groups will have pizza and tackle this interesting question.

ADP-APRIL21

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Librarian to Assist Creating Multicultural Curriculum Learning Community

Posted by isulib on April 19, 2016

Colleen Haas, a full-time instructor of African and African American Studies, has been chosen as a Faculty Fellow in the Faculty Center for Teaching Excellence to develop and implement a Multicultural Curriculum Learning Community at Indiana State.

The Multicultural Curriculum Learning Community will offer the opportunity for faculty to transform existing courses or develop new course content relative to diversity, inclusiveness and global societal perspectives gained from the sessions provided. An announcement calling for participants will be coming soon.

Haas received her bachelor’s degree from The College of St. Catherine in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1983. She earned her master’s (2005) degree and doctorate (2010) in ethnomusicology from Indiana University. Haas spent 12 months researching in Brazil as a Fulbright scholar in 2006. She joined the Indiana State faculty in 2011. Last week, Haas was recognized with the Community-Based Learning and Scholarship Award during Indiana State University’s Faculty Recognition Banquet.

Edith Campbell, an assistant reference and instruction librarian at Cunningham Memorial Library, will assist with the initiative. She received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Cincinnati and master’s degree from Indiana University. She will serve the initiative as a faculty affiliate via the Faculty Center for Teaching Excellence.

Colleen brings an impressive depth of knowledge, experiences, and passion to this initiative,” said Beth Whitaker, director of the Faculty Center for Teaching Excellence. “I am confident that her informed background and collaborative spirit will allow her to lead the new learning community in a highly productive fashion. Edi also comes to this initiative with expertise and energy. She will be assisting in research efforts and program coordination. Under the guidance of these two individuals, I am certain this learning community will afford participants a rewarding opportunity to grow and learn together as they explore the diverse aspects of multicultural curriculum.”

reposted

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April 21: Documentary & Discussion: “Trapped”

Posted by isulib on April 15, 2016

TRAPPED

U.S. abortion clinics are fighting to survive. Since 2010, hundreds of laws regulating abortion clinics have been passed by conservative state legislatures, particularly in the south. These restrictions, known as TRAP laws (or Targeted Regulations of Abortion Providers) are spreading across America. Faced with increased costs of compliance and the alarming fear of violence from protesters, the stakes for the women and men on the frontlines couldn’t be any higher. As the battle heads to the U.S. Supreme Court, the documentary Trapped follows the struggles of the clinic workers and lawyers fighting to keep abortion safe and legal for millions of American women, many of them poor and uninsured.

The Library and the Multidisciplinary Studies Department is hosting a screening of TRAPPED, a new documentary about new state laws targeting abortion providers. The film features concerned, caring, frustrated staff from centers in Texas, Mississippi, and Alabama.  This screening is one of five being shown throughout Indiana during the month of April, to shine a spotlight on the erosion of women’s rights and increasing restrictions to access to health care.  A post-film discussion will be led by Linda Maule, Dean of University College and professor of Political Science.

Documentary Homepage

Trapped – Trailer

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